The Best and Worst TV Diets, From Kim Kardashian's Salad to Olivia Pope's Popcorn

Should you snack like Olivia Pope? Lunch like a Kardashian? Find out which moves to steal—and which to skip. Source: Health bests

Should you snack like Olivia Pope? Lunch like a Kardashian? Find out which moves to steal—and which to skip.
Source: Health bests

The Healthiest Way to Do Intermittent Fasting, According to a Nutritionist

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You've probably been hearing some buzz about intermittent fasting–the weight loss method that alternates fasting days and non-fasting days–especially since there's been more and more research on its potential to help people slim down.

For example, in a new study published in JAMA, researchers divided obese men and women into two groups: One followed a traditional calorie-restricted eating plan, and the other group practiced intermittent fasting. After one year, the participants in both groups experienced similar results in terms of total weight loss, blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar and insulin levels, insulin resistance, and markers for inflammation.

The researchers noted, however, that the participants in the intermittent fasting group had a higher dropout rate (38% compared to 29%), which suggests that the eating plan may be less sustainable over time. In my practice I find that the approach isn't for everyone. That said, if you’re interested in trying it—or you’ve already started—here are six strategies I recommend to maximize your results, and help you stick it out.

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Make every calorie count

There isn't one standard protocol for intermittent fasting. But many plans limit total calories to just 500 on fasting days—which is why it's important to make food quality a priority, and squeeze the most nutrition possible out of your meals and snacks. That means nixing processed foods, and focusing on fresh, healthy fare. Yes, you can technically afford to eat a 100-calorie snack pack of mini-chocolate chips cookies. But spending those same 100 calories on veggies and an organic egg delivers a broad spectrum of nutrients your body needs for energy, immunity, and digestive health. Bottom line: A calorie isn’t just a calorie, and quality is king.

Don’t fast on active days

It’s crucial to make sure you’re giving your body enough food to fuel upcoming activities. So if you’re going to fast Mondays and Wednesdays, don’t put more demands on your body with an intense spin class, or other serious workout. Make fasting days your rest days. Or at the very most, plan to do some stretching or light yoga.

In other words, timing matters. Think of your body like a car: You need to fill the gas tank before you go for a long drive, not the next day. The difference between a car and your body, however, is a car with no fuel will stop, while you can push your under-nourished body to keep moving. But slogging through workouts will only wear your body out, and up your risk of injury.

RELATED: What to Eat Before and After Every Kind of Workout

Focus on satiating foods

Certain foods tend to keep us feeling full longer than others. Generally, satiating nutrients include protein, good fat, and fiber. Think pulses (the umbrella term for beans, lentils, peas, and chickpeas), eggs, poultry and seafood, nuts and seeds, avocado, and extra virgin olive oil.

Be sure to eat these foods on fasting days. Yes, a tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil packs 120 calories out of your 500. But using it to sauté or dress veggies will significantly boost how full you feel after a meal–and prevent lingering, gnawing hunger.

Up your volume

Larger portions don’t always mean more calories. It depends on what you’re eating. For example, three cups of popped popcorn (about the size of three baseballs) counts as a serving of whole grain; but it’s a much larger volume than a half cup of brown rice, which also counts as one serving of whole grain. Bonus: You can eat the popcorn one piece at a time, which makes it seem like even more food.

Raw veggies are another way to fill up your plate without blowing your calorie budget. One medium zucchini provides just 35 calories. And when shredded with a box grater, it becomes a generously sized “bed” for a serving of protein. Other veggies with low calorie counts per serving–which is one cup, or about the size of a tennis ball–include red bell peppers (45 calories), grape tomatoes and broccoli (30), spinach (7), and white button mushrooms (5).

Start to compare the calorie content of foods within the same group that differ in portion size. For example, a dozen steamed or boiled shrimp contains about the same number of calories as a single egg–with significantly more volume and more protein.

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Use herbs and spices generously

Natural seasonings offer several advantages on fasting days. They’re virtually calorie-free, but make meals and snacks more flavorful, aromatic, and visually appealing. They’ve also been shown to boost satiety, and rev up metabolism. Plus they’re chock full of antioxidants and help reduce inflammation in the body, which is tied to healthy metabolism and chronic disease prevention.

Simply adding roasted garlic, fresh basil, and a light drizzle of balsamic vinegar can transform a vine-ripened tomato. Rosemary compliments nearly any oven-roasted veggie. And a combo of lime juice, lime zest, and cilantro can jazz up anything from avocado to cauliflower.

If you aren’t super familiar with using culinary herbs, there are tons of online resources you can check out for guidance. But I also recommend experimenting on your own—I bet you’ll you have fun discovering some new favorite combinations.

Be mindful

On fasting days make a conscious effort to slow your eating pace. One tool that may help is to listen to a guided meditation once a day, even for just five minutes. Short daily meditations help improve mindfulness and slow your pace overall, including during meals and snacks. Eating slower, taking smaller bites, and removing mealtime distractions (including the TV and phone) have all been shown to boost satiety, and naturally curb calorie intake. This strategy is especially effective for helping you stick to your healthy regime—whether it's intermittent fasting or another balanced plan.

Cynthia Sass is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and consultant for the New York Yankees. See her full bio here.

Source: Health bests

 Forget Your BMI and Focus on This Measurement Instead

When it comes to determining whether a person is overweight, body mass index (BMI) is the most widely used measure out there. But doctors admit that BMI—a ratio of weight to height—is far from perfect. Now, a new study suggests there may be a better way to estimate the risks of health problems associated with excess weight.

The new research, published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that waist-to-hip ratio was a better predictor of whether people would die over the course of the study, compared to BMI. This isn’t the first study to reach this conclusion, but it's one of the largest to-date.

Researchers from Loughborough University in the U.K. and the University of Sydney in Australia looked at data from 42,702 men and women living in England and Scotland over a 10-year period. Specifically, they wanted to know if people who carried extra weight around their middles were at increased risks of health problems, compared to those who were technically overweight but carried their extra pounds elsewhere.

Over the course of the study, 5,355 of the participants died. After controlling for factors such as age, gender, smoking status, and physical activity, the researchers found that people who had normal BMIs but who also had “central obesity”—defined as a high waist-to-hip ratio—had a 22% increased risk of death from all causes, compared to people with normal BMIs and healthier waist-to-hip ratios.

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Obese people with central obesity were also at higher risk of death compared to normal-weight and normal-waist individuals.

On the other hand, people who were technically overweight or obese based on their BMIs—but who did not have central obesity—were less likely to die than people with normal BMIs but high waist-to-hip ratios.

Surprisingly, overweight people with central obesity did not have an increased risk of death from all causes, compared to people with a normal weight and smaller waistlines. These findings are counterintuitive, say the authors, but they’re similar to those of previous research: A 2015 study found that people with normal BMIs but central obesity had the worst long-term survival rates, even when compared with overweight and obese people who also had central obesity.

Explaining these “paradoxical findings” is challenging, the authors say. One possibility is that overweight and obese people are more likely to also have extra fat stored around their legs and hips, which has been linked to healthier metabolism.

RELATED: 11 Reasons Why You're Not Losing Belly Fat

The authors also say that limitations in their research—like the fact that BMI and waist measurements were only collected once, rather than several times over the course of the study—may have skewed the results.

But they point out that all participants with central obesity, in every BMI group, were at increased risk of dying specifically from cardiovascular disease. This may imply that the health risks of excess belly fat are specifically related to heart problems, the authors say, more so than other major causes of death.

People with a BMI between 18.5 and 25 are considered normal weight; between 25 and 30 is considered overweight, while 30 and higher is obese. Central obesity is defined as a waist-to-hip ratio of 0.85 or higher for women and 0.9 or higher for men. (Here’s how you can calculate both.)

RELATED: 15 Best Foods for a Flat Belly

Lead author Emmanuel Stamatakis, PhD, associate professor of public health at the University of Sydney, says that while BMI has its flaws, it does provide some useful information—especially for tracking general trends in large groups of people over time.

“Instead of ditching BMI and replacing it with waist-to-hip ratio, which is relatively easy to measure and is consistently associated with cardiovascular health and mortality risk, we should be thinking about adding waist and hip measurements into routine medical examinations and in health studies,” Stamatakis told Health via email.

But Stamatakis says that, on an individual basis, waist measurement might be more important for overall health. “If I had to choose between making sure my BMI or my waist-to-hip ratio are OK, I would go for the latter,” he says.

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BMI can be affected by many things, he says, including the amount of lean muscle mass a person has. (That’s why super-fit people, especially men, can register as overweight based on BMI alone.)

A high waist-to-hip ratio, on the other hand, most likely means high amounts of abdominal fat—which has been definitively linked to serious health risks.

“People with larger waistlines may want to start thinking and, if needed, seek help to alter their lifestyle to reduce that belly fat,” says Stamatakis. “Increasing physical activity, improving diet, and cutting down on alcohol consumption can work miracles if sustained in the long term, and all have a myriad other co-benefits in terms of health and wellbeing.”

Source: Health bests

The ACA increased coverage and access for the chronically ill, but many still face barriers to care

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) increased insurance coverage and access to care for patients with chronic medical conditions, but a year after the law took full effect, many…
Source: Insurance feed

4 Ridiculously Easy Diet Changes to Help Kickstart Your Weight Loss

If you want to shed some pounds, but you’re not into the idea of a complicated diet with hard-to-remember rules, you've come to the right place. These four simple changes will help you lose weight fast, and get you back into your favorite jeans in no time. The best part: there's no "cleansing" required.

Make veggies the star of your meals

Time to load up on those vegetables. I’m talking at least one to two cups (a cup is the size of a tennis ball) at each meal, even breakfast. In addition to being low in calories, veggies are rich in nutrients and high in both fiber and water. By making them the main component of every meal, you’ll eat fewer calories without sacrificing nutrition, and you'll still feel full.

For breakfast, scramble a few eggs in extra-virgin olive oil, Italian seasoning, turmeric, and black pepper, with a handful or two of chopped veggies, like spinach, tomatoes, mushrooms, and bell pepper; enjoy with a side of fresh fruit. At lunch, opt for a salad rather than a sandwich or wrap. And whip up dinners comprised of “noodles” or “rice” made from veggies (spiralized, chopped, or shredded) paired with a lean source of protein (like salmon, chicken breast, or lentils) and a healthy fat (such as avocado, nuts, or seeds).    

RELATED: 16 Ways to Lose Weight Fast

Load up on liquids

If you start your day with coffee, go ahead make it the usual way (even if that includes some sweetener). But limit yourself to just one cup. Then switch to water, or an antioxidant-rich, unsweetened tea (iced or hot); and try to have four 16-ounce servings throughout the course of the day. If you’re craving a little flavor in your water or tea, add fresh mint, basil, ginger root, or a bit of mashed berries.

However, be sure to nix any other drinks that contain sweeteners (even zero-calorie versions) or bubbles. The former may stoke a sweet tooth, or wreak havoc on your appetite, while the latter can leave you bloated. Also take note: To ensure a good night's sleep, stop drinking any caffeinated tea at least six hours before bed. And cut off all fluids, even water, fairly early in the evening to avoid late night trips to the bathroom.

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Streamline your snacks

You should really only snack under two circumstances. The first is when you’re truly, physically hungry (and not just bored or procrastinating or in the habit of nibbling at a certain time of day). The second is when you need some nourishment to tie you over between meals. For example, if you have lunch at noon and dinner isn't till 7 p.m., a healthy snack can keep your metabolism revved, and help stabilize your blood sugar, insulin, and energy levels to prevent overeating later on.

In lieu of processed foods, like chips or sweetened bars, commit to noshing on something more nutritious. Try a golf ball-sized portion of nuts or seeds along with a tennis ball-sized serving of fruit; or a cup of raw veggies (like sliced red bell pepper and cucumber) paired with hummus or roasted chickpeas.    

RELATED: Best Snacks for Weight Loss

Make dark chocolate your sweet treat

Over the next month, try this simple experiment that’s helped many of my clients in a major way: Build what I call a “dark chocolate escape” into your day. That means enjoying a few squares of high-quality dark chocolate (with at least 70% cacao) during “you time,” without any distractions. So no laptop, no TV, and no phone.

Research shows that a small, daily dark chocolate indulgence curbs cravings for both sweet and salty foods. This trick can help you resist temptation for other goodies. Having one square after lunch and one after dinner may be a smart way to break up your treat, and keep your sweet and/or salt tooth adequately satisfied.     

Cynthia Sass is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and a consultant for the New York Yankees. See her full bio here. 

Source: Health bests