This Woman Lost 77 Lbs. in a Year By Cooking With an Instant Pot Every Night

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This article originally appeared on People.com.

An Instant Pot was this woman’s one way ticket to weight loss.

At the start of this year, weighing 212 lbs., Brittany Williams decided to take control of her health by challenging herself to make dinner every night, she tells PEOPLE. The mom of three got her husband involved by having him agree to not bring takeout home for the duration of the year, and instead she decided to bust out the Instant Pot that had been lying around her house mostly untouched. She’s now down 77 lbs. since January 3 and 125 lbs. in total.

“I’ve had the Instant Pot for four years but I didn’t use it much and when I did it was for comfort foods like mac and cheese, ribs and cheesecake,” Williams, 27, says. “Starting in January I began using the Instant Pot every day—sometimes several times a day, five to six nights a week for dinner and several mornings for breakfast. I even use it to warm leftovers instead of my microwave.”

The blogger behind Instant Loss says the trendy, easy-to-use appliance that works as a pressure cooker, slow cooker, and rice cooker has made “making healthy food convenient and allowed me to succeed where I’ve failed many times before.”

Dropping the weight wasn’t all thanks to the push of a button though. Williams overhauled her diet to mirror something similar to paleo, avoiding most grains, dairy and sugar. “It’s simple. If it comes from the earth and is unprocessed, I eat it,” she writes on her blog. She loads up on vegetables and limits her fruit to avoid natural occurring sugars. 

“Eggs, meat, alternative flours (coconut, almond, and cassava), oils (coconut, avocado, and olive), nuts, seeds, and dark chocolate are some other examples of what I eat,” she says.

Williams is constantly sharing Instant Pot recipes—like dairy-free creamed corn and chickpea tacos—that not only adhere to her diet but most importantly, save time.

“There are nights I don’t start cooking dinner till 6pm because I lose track of time or we don’t get home till late, nights that I used to pull out of a frozen pizza or have my husband grab dinner on his way home from work,” she writes. “My Instant Pot has eliminated those nights. I can throw a few things in the pot and have dinner on the table in under a half hour.”

Source: Health bests

Do These 5 Things Right Now for a Healthier Holiday Season

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I’ll only have one small glass of wine at the office holiday party. I’ll still make it to the gym three days a week. I won’t leave gift shopping until the last minute and stress myself out. These are promises plenty of us make to ourselves as the holiday season gets into full swing. And they’re promises most of us will break.

That's because it's easy for healthy intentions to go MIA when a coworker pulls together a last-minute happy hour plan, or you made yourself a way-too-long gift shopping list, or you took on another holiday-related responsibility that's throwing you off your game. 'Tis the season for excess, we know, but striving for balance and maintaining your usual healthy habits during December will also help you avoid starting the new year with a #dietstartstomorrow mentality.

To help you survive the month with your mind and body strong and begin 2018 on the right foot, we rounded up five simple things you can do right now

RELATED: 5 Ways to Ease Holiday Stress in 5 Minutes or Less

Buy a pack of gym classes

Dropping some cash ahead of time for a 10-pack of classes or one-month class pass at your favorite fitness studio may be pricey. But knowing that they're already paid for will motivate you to keep up your sweat sessions all season long—because not even a holiday cookie swap can convince you to throw money out the window. Buy them now, and you'll have a few left over to use during the first week of January, so you're inspired to follow through on your New Year's fitness resolution as well.

Get cooking

Chances are you’ll catch up with friends over drinks or brunch this month. Instead of chatting over high-calorie eggs Benedict or cocktails, connect in a setting where healthy food is the focus—like a cooking class. Book a vegetarian class for you and your girlfriend ahead of time, or make a Sunday meal prep date now, so you’ll have nutritious meal options on hand when the holidays close in. Having good-for-you eats already prepped will help make last-minute holiday cookie dough binges less likely.

RELATED: 5 Healthy Baking Swaps You Need to Try

Slim down your holiday dinner

Heading to a festive potluck? Do a little research to find recipes similar to yours that use lower-fat ingredients, Wendy Bazilian, RD, nutritionist and co-author of Eat Clean, Stay Lean, suggested in a prior interview with Health. “Even better, find a version that incorporates some healthy foods that simultaneously bump up the nutrition while reducing extra calories, sugars, or fat.”

A few swap ideas we love: If you’re tasked with bringing dip to a party, substitute protein-rich Greek yogurt for sour cream. Or cook up whipped cauliflower instead of mashed potatoes. Hey, every bit counts.

WATCH THE VIDEO: A 5-Minute Meditation to Help You Find Your Calm Now 

Subscribe to a self-care box

Treat yourself to a subscription box today that will make staying healthy through the holiday season so much easier. Sign on with a meal kit delivery service so you already know you have good-for-you meals covered, or subscribe to a beauty box ($30 for 3 months, birchbox.com) that will tame your stressed-out skin during party season. Being proactive will automatically make you feel like you’re starting December on a high note. Plus, who wants to make a last-minute drugstore run for sparkly eye shadow on New Year's Eve?

Download a meditation app

The holiday season may be the most wonderful time of the year, but it’s also the most hectic, when your usual routine falls by the wayside and family and friends you've avoided all year long come back into your life. Not surprisingly, your mental health can take a hit. To stress less this December, download one of these apps that take you through guided meditations and mindfulness exercises. We have a feeling they’ll come in handy after your family talks politics at the dinner table.

Source: Health bests

The One Thing Sabotaging Your Weight-Loss Goals

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When certified nutrition specialist and personal trainer Jay Nixon meets with new clients for the first time, he typically hears the same opening line: “I’ve tried everything to lose weight, but I always gain it back.” And in almost every case, the reason is the same, he says: “They didn’t change anything psychologically."

In his recent book The Overweight Mind, Nixon argues that only about 20% of weight-loss success is mechanical—or what you eat, and how often (and intensely) you exercise. The rest, he believes, is mental: “Getting a handle on [your] mindset is what leads to long-lasting results."

Psychological change might actually feel more daunting than adding an extra serving of veggies to your plate. But Nixon promises it’s easier than you think. In fact, it can be as simple as changing your vocabulary.

There are three short words he wishes everyone would ban when it comes to exercise and diet: can’t, won’t, and don’t. “Those words wrap around everything having to do with people's physical condition, to the point that they don’t even realize they’re saying [them] anymore,” he says. “They don’t have awareness around how often they use these words.”

Using them less often, he says, can have a direct impact on your fitness and weight-loss success. Here, a few examples of how you can flip the script on all that negative talk.

RELATED: How to Trick Your Brain Into Eating Less, According to an Expert in 'Gastrophysics'

"I don't like vegetables"

Nixon has found that in the context of food and fitness, people often say “don’t” because of a negative past experience. For example, if someone says he doesn't like vegetables, it could be because eating kale once made him feel sick. Or if someone says she doesn't run, it may be because she once suffered an injury from running.

When his clients use the word "don't," he reminds them that “old experience doesn’t need to dictate current behavior." Then he helps them take small steps to turn those don'ts into dos. For example, he might encourage the non-runner to simply move as quickly as she can. Odds are, after a few weeks, she'll have naturally picked up the pace.

"I can't do 10 push-ups"

“I get clients to reframe that sentence,” Nixon says. Instead of declaring you can’t do 10 push-ups, remind yourself that you can do 1 push-up. “Every day, reapply it,” he says. So the next day tell yourself, I can do two push-ups, and keep going until you hit your goal.

"I won't wake up early to work out"

People who use “won’t” in a sentence like this have convinced themselves the statement is a fact, says Nixon. But the statement only feels true because of how often the person has repeated it. Again, you need to reframe the thought: Think about what you will try–say, two early mornings a week–and then focus on how to make that behavior stick.

It can help to create a sense of accountability for yourself, Nixon suggests. “I try to get people to form a sort of community,” he explains, whether that means recruiting a workout buddy to meet you at the gym before dawn, or finding a friend on a similar path, who you can share your plans and progress with. Or if prefer to go it alone, start a journal, Nixon suggests. Even writing down what you will do in a journal can keep you honest, he says.

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These reframing tricks will help you stay on track no matter what phrase follows the word "don’t," "can't," or "won’t," Nixon says. No weight-loss journey is perfectly smooth, he points out. “When we hit roadblocks, we always fall back a little bit. But if you’re working on your psychology, you won’t fall as far.”

Source: Health bests

Why You Really, Seriously Don’t Need to Diet Before Your Wedding

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Whether you've visited the Stone Fox Bride store in New York Citywhich sells a selection of gorgeous gowns, headpieces, and jewelry for brides in search of non-traditional wedding day looksor are one of @stonefoxbride's 123,000 followers on Instagram, chances are you've heard of Molly Guy. In her debut book, Stone Fox Bride: Love, Lust, and Wedding Planning for the Wild at Heart ($45; amazon.com), which hits shelves December 5, the wedding guru gets real about the pressure to shed pounds before the big day, as well as how she (kind of) overcame her own fear of the scale.

Unless you grew up in a cave without fashion magazines, there’s a good chance that at some point in your life, you’ve hated your body and taken unhealthy measures to try to change the way it looks. The truth is, getting married can turn even the most self-confident lady into a shivering, self-loathing mess. Transitions, even exciting ones, are a perfect petri dish for vulnerability. In the weeks before my wedding, I felt about as secure in my appearance as I did when I was a prepubescent sixth grader with blue braces and one boob.

For some hideous reason, modern-day wedding culture dictates that brides are supposed to look one hundred percent perfect walking down the aisle. Like Miss America–perfect: smiley, shiny, taut, tight, gleaming. God forbid there should be a stretch mark, cellulite dimple, split end, chipped tooth, or cracked cuticle in sight. No wonder so many brides obsess over fad diets.

I’ll admit that I’ve bought into much of this stuff at one point or another.

Blame it on the nineties. I came of age in an insane era when Kate Moss was queen. Homeless and on heroin was the look; drowsy, lead-lidded girls with lank hair and gold hoops in their tits who didn't eat, didn't cry, didn't care. For a good twenty years I struggled with food issues: laxatives, bingeing, purging, the works. So sad. In college I had a "nutritionist" who sold me pyramid schemes of vitamins and delivered deadpan lectures on the high glycemic index of a carrot. Beneath her firm tutelage, I’d record my daily meals in a Moleskine: tiny kale salads, one hundred calories of hard cheese, a single slice of Ezekiel bread. Then I’d have a "cheat day" where I’d pig out on Pringles and pizza. My body image insanity died down around the time I met [my now-husband], but reared up in the weeks leading up to my wedding. I couldn't get over the fact that everyone was going to be looking at me. I thought I should be on some crazy crash diet, but I wasn't, which stressed me out even more. I guess I was just feeling insecure and vulnerable, trying to control some aspect of the madness.

These days my compulsion to maintain a certain weight is much less crazy than it used to be. Don’t get me wrong, it still flares up every now and then, but way less than before. Sorry to get so Oprah, but the body stuff is a lifelong journey. It comes and goes. Even today, if someone tells me, "You look really healthy," I’ll be thinking, You mean fat? Try not to use the pressure of your impending marriage as an excuse to emotionally whip yourself. If the mean wedding demon happens to pay you a visit, give him a friendly hello, then tell him to f— off.

Feel Foxy, Not Hungry

Eat, for Fox Sake: Diets beget anxiety; anxiety begets bad vibes. Trust me, you don’t have to lose weight for your wedding. Do you really want your partner committing to a skinny, withered, unrecognizable version of you? No. Most likely he fell in love and knew he wanted to spend his life with you on some random afternoon when you two were lying naked in bed after really good sex, happy and laughing and probably kind of awkward. Your hair was sticking up, your cheeks were flushed, and you were at your most radiant and comfortable and peaceful. You might have even had a little piece of food stuck in your teeth. Bottom line: You want to look like yourself.

Good Shape/Bad Shape: Watch it with the fitness class packs that take place in an air-conditioned room with an instructor on a Bluetooth screaming at you to speed it up. They will most likely turn you into a fidgety, high-stress mess. Better to do something you love in moderation to get in shape: taking long walks, dance classes, bike rides, yoga. Exercising while wearing pajamas in your living room along to Jane Fonda or Richard Simmons is also hilarious.

Save Face: I subscribe to the "less is more" philosophy when it comes to most things, makeup included. My wedding beauty regimen was fairly low-maintenance—although I did get my roots done, eyelash extensions, and—truth be told—a spray tan. Looking back at the pics I DEFINITELY could have done without the tan. Whatever you decide, do your damnedest not to overdo it.

Sweet Dreams: I know you’ve heard it before, but getting at least eight hours of sleep a night will do wonders for your skin, vibe, and peace of mind. If you tend toward late nights and/or insomnia, I recommend turning off all devices by eight p.m., taking a warm bath with Epsom salts, and getting into bed with nothing more than a book by ten. The more you sleep, the better you feel. The better you feel, the better you look.

Rise and Shine: The morning of your wedding, try to stay away from multiple cups of coffee and sugary white flour things that’ll spike your blood sugar. I’m a fan of soft-boiled eggs, oatmeal, berries, tea, and whole-grain toast with almond butter. Take a minute or two to sit silently and gather your thoughts if you can. Beyond the drama, adrenaline, and nerves is the amazing blessing of having found your person. Try to let that sink in on some level.

Buy the book: $45; amazon.com

 

Excerpted from Stone Fox Bride by Molly Rosen Guy. Copyright © 2017 by Molly Rosen Guy. Excerpted by arrangement with Spiegel & Grau, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Source: Health bests

How This Woman Has Maintained Her 125 Lbs. Weight Loss for Over 7 Years

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This article originally appeared on People.com.

Samantha Call’s weight loss journey began as the result of a tragic loss.

Call – who said she was “always the big girl” growing up and reached 265 lbs. by her senior year of high school – lost her father to heart disease in 2008. Her dad, who had struggled with obesity, was just 48-years-old.

“I’ll never forget sitting with my [12-year-old] brother after my dad had passed, when he told me ‘Samantha, I don’t want you to die like daddy did,’ Call, now 33, told PEOPLE.  “That broke my heart but gave me the drive that I needed to start my journey.”

First, the Callis, Maine resident consulted with her doctor. “My blood pressure was through the roof,” says Call. “I had wanted to get gastric bypass [surgery] because I felt like I had failed so many times on diets. I couldn’t stick with it. But, my doctor pushed me to lose the weight for myself and on my own. It lit a fire under me.”

In early 2009, Call found success with Atkins. And after a year and a half got down to 132 lbs. Call has maintained her weight loss for about seven years.

“I’ve always been someone who loved bacon and loved eggs, that was easy to me,” Call said of her new low carb program. “How many diets can you do that you get to eat bacon and eggs every morning?”

She also learned to love lean meats and vegetables, and now enjoys making her own healthy meals. “My fiancé is very supportive with what I cook us for dinner,” she says. “He’s always been a physically fit guy so it helps. He’s a huge support.”

While losing weight, Call gradually added in exercise, and now works out for an hour in the morning before work. “It’s part of my daily routine,” says Call, who switches between fitness DVDs, a Pilates ball and at-home gym equipment.  She even ran a half-marathon two years ago, and hopes to do more in the future.

Still on Atkins, she also allows herself a cheat day once a week, but doesn’t go overboard. “I have my mind fixated on one thing that I’m going to have,” she says. For example, instead of the three large plates of fried, carb-heavy food she used to get a Chinese buffet, Call now has a small plate and maybe half an egg roll. “It’s all about portion control.”

Another big change? Her confidence. Call, who was married once before, felt uncomfortable wearing her wedding dress at her previous size.

“I look at those photos and it was unflattering,” she says. “I’m excited for the fact that I’ll be able to pick out a beautiful dress and feel good about myself because I was very self-conscious about myself the first time around. I’m happy that I’ll look and feel good.”

Source: Health bests

Here’s How the ‘Biggest Loser’ Contestants Have Kept the Weight Off

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Your diet may help you lose weight, but exercise appears to be the key to keeping it off.

A new study, published in the journal Obesity, tracked 14 former Biggest Loser contestants to determine how some of them kept weight off after the show. Physical activity, the researchers determined, was the clear answer — even though diet, not exercise, was shown to help the contestants lose weight in the first place.

Half of the study participants maintained their weight loss after the Biggest Loser ended, while the other half gained the pounds back. Over six years of follow-up, the maintainers tended to be far more active than the other group, increasing physical activity by up to 160% since they started losing weight. Those who regained weight, by contrast, only increased physical activity by 25% to 34%. Overall, maintainers completed an average of 80 minutes of moderate exercise or 35 minutes of vigorous exercise each day — well exceeding the national physical activity guidelines of 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. 

The findings tie into another study published by the same researchers last year. Back then, they found that contestants' metabolisms slowed drastically after their dramatic weight losses, significantly cutting into the number of calories they were able to burn each day. As a result, many contestants saw the pounds creep back on, sometimes even exceeding their pre-show weights. 

Exercise, the new study suggests, may counteract that effect, helping people burn enough calories to stay thin. But the time commitment of a robust fitness regimen can make weight maintenance an uphill battle, according to former Biggest Loser contestant and study author Dr. Jennifer Kerns, who is now an obesity specialist at Washington's Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

“The amount of time and dedication it takes to manage one’s food intake and prioritize exercise every day can be an untenable burden for many people," Kerns told the New York Times. "It's totally unfair to judge those who can't do it." 

Source: New feed

Make the Diagnosis: Woodland Walk Goes Wrong

(MedPage Today) — A 28-year-old woman visiting friends in Connecticut went to urgent care with multiple skin lesions on her legs after taking a stroll in the woods the previous morning. She said that first her skin felt like it was burning, then painful erythematous lesions appeared, and then vesicles had formed. They had walked through a field of pretty wildflowers to take photos on the nice sunny day, but otherwise had stayed on the trail. The patient was certain she hadn’t come in contact with any poison ivy because she had been on the lookout for it.

Can you diagnose the patient?
Source: Dermatology

Top plastic surgery clinic

A group claiming to be behind the breach said it had “terabytes” of data, the Daily Bea
The Metropolitan Police is investigating the attack.
The alleged hackers, using the pseudonym The Dark Overlord, said they had obtained photos showing various body parts of clients, including genitals.
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Some of these images have been sent to the Daily Beast.
The hackers also claimed that the data contained information on “royal families” and added that they planned to distribute the patient list and corresponding photos online.
“We are still working to establish exactly what data has been compromised,” LBPS said in a statement.
“We are horrified that they have now targeted our patients.”
Katie PriceImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image caption
One of the clinic’s recent clients is model and TV presenter Katie Price
A spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Police said it was notified of a suspected breach on 17 October.
She added that there had been no arrests and that enquiries by the Organised Crime Command were continuing.
LBPS is known to have high-profile clients, including model and TV presenter Katie Price, who recently used her Instagram account to thank the clinic for her facelift.
The Information Commissioner’s Office said, “We are aware of this incident and are looking into the details.
“All organisations are required under data protection law to keep people’s personal data safe and secure.”

Body-Positive Instagram Star Claps Back at Critics of Her Skin Removal Surgery: 'Loving Yourself Does NOT Mean You Have to Stay the Same’

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Instagram star Amanda Roberts (@mandas_muffintop) credits the body-positive Instagram community with helping her love and appreciate her body when she was at her heaviest. But after she made the decision to have weight loss surgery and subsequent skin removal surgery, Roberts was surprised to find herself at the receiving end of negative comments on the social platform, where she has nearly, 70,000 followers.

"I am a self-proclaimed self-love and body positive activist, but people think that because I decided to finally rein in my health (after a lifetime of obesity that was affecting my health), I didn't truly love myself," she told Health in an email. "I've received comments like, 'If you love yourself so much, why did you change yourself?' It's truly frustrating to try to explain over and over again that loving yourself does not mean you have to stay the same."

RELATED: What Are Skin Tags—and How Can I Have Them Removed?

A viral before-and-after photo Roberts recently shared on Instagram expands on this message. "I loved myself at 330lbs [sic] on the left. I loved myself at 180lbs with loose skin. And I love myself now at 185lbs with my scars," she wrote. "I decided to change myself BECAUSE I love myself. This my my journey, and I’m proud of it."

Roberts first discovered the body-positive ("Bo Po," as she calls it) online community when she weighed over 300 lbs., and tells Health that she's mostly received support and encouragement on the platform. "It wasn't until I found the Bo Po community that I truly started loving myself," she says. "From that inner self-love, I found a reason to want to be the best me."

After undergoing weight loss surgery, Roberts immediately realized that she would one day need skin removal surgery, too. "I had always had issues with rashes and sores, especially due to eczema, when I was plus-size, and I knew that the loose skin was only going to make it worse," she explains. As a stay-at-home mom in a low-income household, though, Roberts couldn't afford to get the surgery right away. In the meantime, she used her Instagram account to help spread the message that "loose skin isn't grotesque—it's very common and is worth the battle to lose weight if that is what someone decided was best for them."

When she landed a spot on the popular CBS show The Doctors, Roberts was fortunate to have the skin removal surgery done for free. The procedure was a success, and helped ease her day-to-day discomfort. But afterwards, Roberts began to notice some negative comments from followers. "I got backlash about it, with more people saying, 'If you love your loose skin so much, why are you having it removed?'" she says. "A lot of people tried to say I wasn't a body positive activist."

RELATED: I Had Seven Pounds of Skin Removed After Major Weight Loss—Here's What You Should Know

Luckily, though, Roberts says that the majority of her followers understand that the surgery was about feeling comfortable in her own skin, and she's "thankful" for their kindness and support. Today, she's focusing on using her platform to celebrate bodies of all shapes and sizes.

"I think my body has always been amazing at every stage of my journey," she says. "We all deserve to practice self-love and feel positive about our bodies, no matter what they may look like."

Source: New feed

How Two Sisters Helped Each Other Shed a Collective 106 Lbs.: "Sisterhood Gave Us the Strength to Change"

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Gina: In college, late night takeout was one of our favorite pastimes. I soon found myself just shy of 200 pounds, while Amy weighed in at 138. Being overweight began taking its toll.

Amy: A stranger’s rude comment here, a pair of extra-large pants there added up, but photos from a family beach trip in 2004 were the final push we needed. That fall, we signed up for Weight Watchers.

Lessons in healthy

Gina: From day one, we attended the weekly meetings together, debriefing each other on lessons learned. For me, having smarter portions of my favorite foods—hello, pasta!—and logging regular runs and boot camp classes were key. I was down to 155 pounds by the summer of 2005.

Amy: While the point system helped me make better food choices and drop 30 pounds in just six months, after a year I trusted myself to eat clean on my own. I started meal prepping staples like egg muffins or avocado toast for breakfast.

Gina: I fluctuated after my initial loss, but staying true to what I had learned helped me ditch another 20 pounds by 2007. After that, I turned to MyFitnessPal.

RELATED: These Real Women Showed Their Excess Skin to Make an Important Point About Weight Loss

Stronger together 

Amy: Exercise wasn’t on my radar until 2011, when Gina and I ran a 5K. After that, I was hooked.

Gina: Tracking what I ate and working with a trainer with Amy kept me at 135 pounds for years. Then, in 2015, I stopped snacking after dinner and started using a food scale. The result: I hit my goal weight of 122. Finally, victory.

Amy: We’ve now completed five half marathons, and I’m down to 108 pounds, even after having a baby in 2015.

Gina: We love that our weight loss has been a team effort. Sisterhood gave us the strength to change.

Gina and Amy's tone-it-up tips

1. Go halfsies: We often share an entrée when we eat out. That way, we know we’re eating a reasonable portion. Bonus: We don’t feel bad getting the occasional scoop of ice cream afterward! It’s all about balance.

2. Love your lower body: We used to hate leg day, but strengthening our lower bodies helped us shave 20 minutes off our half-marathon time.

3. Remix your sweets: We love creating healthier versions of our favorite splurges, like Brownie Overnight Oats: oats, mashed banana, almond milk, vanilla, cocoa powder, cinnamon, and chia seeds. Yum!

 

As told to Anthea Levi

Source: New feed

Make the Diagnosis: College Girl’s Scaly Skin Scare

(MedPage Today) — Case Findings: An 18-year-old international college student went to the campus health clinic a few weeks after arriving from India. Before she left home, she had noticed some small brown macules that were widespread, primarily on her trunk. They were very itchy, but leaving the heat of India had helped and otherwise they weren’t a problem. She hadn’t had time to get to a doctor for a diagnosis while she was preparing to leave for college. Now, the lesions had developed an annular configuration and a fine scaly plaque, and the itching was bothering her once again.

Can you diagnose the patient?
Source: Dermatology

Craig Robinson Lost 50 Lbs. By Going Vegan and Cutting Out Alcohol: 'It Was Much Easier Than I Thought'

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This article originally appeared on People.com.

Craig Robinson is feeling better than ever.

The star of the new series Ghosted talked about his slimmer physique on Harry Connick Jr.’s talk show, Harry.

“I lost a bunch of weight, I lost about 50 lbs.,” Robinson, 45, says.

The former The Office actor says his weight loss started as an experiment.

“I haven’t been drinking,” Robinson explains. “Since January I just put down the alcohol, I was going to detox. I had heard, I don’t know how true it is, but I heard you can regenerate your liver in six months. I was like let me see if I can go six months and I just haven’t gone back.”

And his alcohol detox inspired other healthy habits.

“[I’m] working out and I’ve been trying this vegan lifestyle too. It’s amazing,” Robinson says. “There are so many great vegan restaurant and dishes. It’s much easier than I thought it would be.”

Still, he does miss one dairy-filled dish.

“Mac and cheese,” Robinson says without hesitation.

On Ghosted, Robinson plays a skeptic mall cop who gets roped into investigating unexplained paranormal activities with a true believer, played by Adam Scott.

Source: New feed

These Real Women Showed Their Excess Skin to Make an Important Point About Weight Loss

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Stories about people who shed lots of weight after adopting a healthier lifestyle are super inspirational, especially if a photo shows a person looking healthy and happy at her goal weight. But often something important is glossed over: that dropping major pounds tends to leave a dieter with loose skin.

Some successful dieters choose to have the skin removed surgically. Others live with it and make a point about it on social media—it's a very real part of their journey, after all. Here are six women who got real on Instagram about their excess skin and how they struggle to deal with it.

After shedding 185 pounds in 15 months, Jessica Weber was left with excess skin around her midsection. “I was always prepared for it, but it is still such a struggle to deal with daily,” Weber told People. “I’ve seen some people lose weight and have it not be such a problem, but I wasn’t that lucky.”

Weber regularly shares bits of her new, healthier lifestyle on Instagram, along with motivational messages. "I'm still learning to love my new body and ths journey that i Am on!" she admits in one post, which shows her bearing her stomach in a bikini.

When you think of a bodybuilder, ripped muscles and a perfectly taut stomach come to mind. Jana Roller is a bodybuilder who fits part of this stereotype, with one exception—she chooses to show off her excess skin from weight loss when she wears her competition bikini. 

Meeting a major weight-loss goal offers much to celebrate, and Jordaan Spark didn't let her loose skin stop her from doing just that, posting this snap of her boyfriend picking her up in a pool. The 24-year-old told People she doesn't want to "sugarcoat" weight loss, which is why she opted to post the photo.

After losing over 100 pounds, Rachel Graham shared a photo of her excess skin. While she said it sometimes makes her self-conscious, she wouldn't change her weight-loss journey for the world, since it's made her happier and healthier. "I'd be lying if I said my loose skin wasn't an insecurity of mine.. But I refuse to let it consume me," wrote Graham.

Hitting the beach in a swimsuit can provoke anxiety no matter what you weigh. But Jacqueline Adan went for it, bearing her excess skin from a 350-pound weight loss. When onlookers reacted critically to Adan's body, she strutted her stuff and then posted this on Instagram. "I am not going to let what other people think of me stop me from living my life,” she wrote. “They do not know me. They do not know how I have worked my ass off to lose 350 pounds. They do not know how I am recovering from major surgeries. They have no right to sit and point and laugh at me.”

Simone Anderson shed 194 pounds and documented the whole process on her Instagram page. Now, the lifestyle blogger shares everything from her cute outfits to her workouts to her incredible before-and-after photos, which remind her followers of her inspiring journey. In an interview with People, Anderson shared her thoughts on the excess skin: “I needed to show that yes, I do have loose skin, and it’s actually a side effect of something I am proud of. Obviously, I can’t wait for it to be gone, but it’s not something I’m ashamed of or embarrassed of.”

Source: New feed

This Is the Crazy Amount of Money You Can Save by Losing Weight

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If you’re overweight or obese, losing a few pounds may save you some serious cash. A new study has shown that weight loss at any age resulted in significant financial perks, with people around age 50 saving the most—an average of $36,278(!) over the course of their lifetimes.

The new research, published in Obesity, is the first to take into account not only the medical costs associated with obesity and its related diseases, but also losses in productivity at work that could be attributed to weight. This helps paint a more complete picture of the real price tag of extra pounds, according to the authors.

“People often think of obesity as an insurance issue, and they know that expensive health care problems are associated with it,” says lead author says Bruce Y. Lee, MD, executive director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “But they rarely think about the full magnitude of its societal and workplace costs.”

To find these numbers, Dr. Lee and his colleagues developed a computer model to represent the U.S. adult population, and estimated lifetime health effects for people who were obese, overweight, or healthy weight at ages 20 through 80. The model simulated the health status of these three groups year by year, and tracked medical costs (to the insurer or health-care facility), productivity losses, and sick time they would likely sustain as a result of their weight.

RELATED: 57 Ways to Lose Weight Forever, According to Science

They found that, at every age between 20 and 80, going from one weight category to another resulted in significant cost differences. A 20-year-old who goes from obese to overweight, for example, would save an average of $17,655 over his or her lifetime. If that same person went from obese to a healthy weight, those savings would grow to about $28,020.

Middle-age adults had even more to gain: The model suggested that an obese 40-year-old could save between $18,000 and $32,000 over their lifetime by losing enough to be simply overweight or a healthy weight. Cost savings peaked at age 50, with an average total savings of more than $36,000.

The cost gap between being obese versus overweight narrowed as people aged, so that people between 50 and 80 benefited much more from moving to the healthy weight category, rather than simply moving from obese to overweight. “This emphasizes the importance of weight loss as people get older,” the study authors wrote in their paper, “for both individuals with obesity and individuals with overweight.”

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Dr. Lee says it was a bit surprising that these cost savings remained significant throughout every decade of a person’s life. “Someone might think that if they’re 80 years old and they’ve lived their entire life without losing weight, then maybe it’s not worth trying at that point,” he says. “Our study suggests that if you really want to focus on reducing costs, then it is actually still important.”

Dr. Lee points out that the productivity losses in the study were based on median wage—and that if a person makes a higher-than-average salary, they’re likely to lose even more because of obesity-related problems. “You’re essentially forfeiting potential salary, you’re going to the hospital and the doctor’s office, you’re getting too sick to work, or your life is getting cut short,” he says.

Dr. Lee hopes the research helps employers realize the importance of prioritizing their workers’ health and wellbeing. He also hopes it serves as an incentive for people who know they need to lose weight but haven’t been motivated to do so for their health alone. “Everyone is interested in trying to save money and maximize what they can do with their salary,” he says, “and this study suggests one way they can do that.”

Source: New feed